August 9, 2012

Tantalizing Tongue Trivia

Have you ever wondered why your tongue changes its appearance? Or why your tastebuds seem not to work sometimes?  When your tongue acts strangely, it may be trying to tell you something. Check out these interesting facts from Dr. Peter Pate and boost your knowledge about the tongue!

Tongue Facts

  • The tongue is the strongest muscle in the body and allows you to eat, drink, talk, and make funny faces (about 85% of the population can curl their tongues into a tube).
  • Your tongue is the only muscle that is connected at only one end.
  • Even after brushing and flossing your teeth, bacteria at the back of your tongue can still make your breath foul. In fact, approximately 50% of the bacteria in your mouth reside on the surface of your tongue. Be sure to brush your tongue as a part of your daily oral hygiene routine. You can use the soft bristles of your toothbrush or a tongue scraper, and be sure to rinse thoroughly.
  • Your tongue is like a fingerprint; no two are alike. (more…)

August 8, 2012

Technology for Better Dental Care

At Dentistry in Buckhead, we pride ourselves on exceeding our patients’ expectations. Dr. Pate and our trained, compassionate team will make you feel like part of the family by providing personalized attention and exceptional dental care, backed by advanced technology. Here, Dr. Pate lists just a few of the technological advances that we offer to give you the smile you’ve always wanted.

DIAGNOdent

Cavities are the most common dental issue that Dr. Pate treats. DIAGNOdent uses a low-intensity laser to detect signs of decay more precisely and at an earlier stage than previous methods. When cavities are found early, there is less decay to remove, so Dr. Pate can preserve more of your natural tooth structure. DIAGNOdent’s laser detection also allows Dr. Pate to monitor areas of concern without the repeated use of X-rays.

Digital X-Rays

The greatest advantage of digital radiography is safety. Digital X-rays require up to 90% less radiation and provide a much clearer picture of your teeth than a traditional X-ray machine. You can view the detailed images on a monitor as Dr. Pate explains his finding and treatment recommendations. Also, digital X-rays are much easier to store, study and transfer than traditional film records, and they require no hazardous chemicals for development.

Intraoral Camera

Ever wonder what the inside of your mouth looks like up close? Our intraoral camera lets us take you on a virtual tour of your mouth. We prefer to keep our patients at the center of their treatment plans. The camera captures images that give us visual aids to guide you through your diagnosis and treatment options, so you’ll be informed every step of the way. (more…)

Getting to the Root of Tooth Sensitivity

Chances are, you have experienced the discomfort of sensitive teeth.  Sensitivity in the  mouth can be a sign of other underlying issues.  Teeth feature three primary layers: the protective outer enamel, the sensitive dentin, and at the core, a canal that houses nerves and connective tissue. Enamel is the hardest tissue in the body and the second hardest naturally occurring substance on our planet. Dentin is a softer tissue that features tiny tubules, or channels, that allow sensations of pressure and temperature to be conducted to the tooth’s nerve. The nerves that lie within the inner canal then send signals to the brain.

Thin Enamel

Acid erosion and tooth wear can thin the protective enamel on the outside of teeth. Thin enamel provides less insulation, making teeth more sensitive to temperature fluctuations and pressure. Erosion is most often caused by acid in foods or from stomach acid. Enamel wear most often results from grinding and clenching teeth, a condition called bruxism.

Exposed Dentin

The crowns of teeth are covered with enamel, but the roots are not. If the gums recede, roots become exposed. The slightest pressure, such as that from wind, can cause intense pain to exposed teeth roots. Temperature fluctuations will also cause discomfort. Gums can recede for a number of reasons, including gum disease, grinding, or aging. (more…)